Pregnancy Health Archives - BabyQ

Sleep Issues During Pregnancy

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As we continue to look at sleep issues during pregnancy we realize young moms-to-be are not sleeping well enough. The most common reasons women do not sleep well during pregnancy are: Snoring as their nasal passages become swollen from fluid retention Restless legs associated with iron deficiency General discomfort In the latest poll on “Sleep in America” the National Sleep Foundation reported: Exercisers report better sleep than self-described non-exercisers even though they say they sleep the same amount each night (6 hours and 51 minutes, average on weeknights). Vigorous, moderate and light exercisers are significantly more likely to say “I had a good night’s sleep” every night or almost every night on work nights than non-exercisers (67%-56% vs. 39%). Also, more than three-fourths of exercisers (76%-83%) say their sleep quality was very good or fairly good in the past two weeks, compared to slightly more than one-half of non-exercisers (56%)….

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Do Babies Breathe in the Womb?

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Do Babies Breathe in the Womb? In the sense of inhaling and exhaling, no your baby does not breathe. In fact, his lungs are filled with fluid while in your tummy, so even if he wanted to breathe, he couldn’t. This is also why you should not be alarmed if your baby’s cord is wrapped around his neck at any point during your pregnancy. He does not get his air this way, and the cord will usually unwrap itself shortly. However, that doesn’t mean your baby doesn’t practice breathing. Later on in your pregnancy, you will feel your baby get hiccups, which is just him studiously working on his breathing for preparation of his impending arrival. Your baby’s first real breath is usually heard in the form of a cry at the time of delivery. How does my baby get the oxygen he needs to thrive? Even though your baby…

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Breastfeeding

How To Tell If Your Baby Is Getting Enough Breast Milk?

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Why is breastfeeding so important for your baby? The American Academy of Pediatrics strongly recommends that infants be given breast milk exclusively for the first six months of their lives and then solid foods and/or formula should be combined with breast milk at least until the child reaches 12 months old. The reason for the emphasis on breastfeeding is because of the benefits it provides to the baby. Breast milk contains all of the vitamins, protein, and fat your infant needs for healthy growth in a form that baby can easily digest. It also provides some important health advantages: • Infants who are given only breast milk for the first four months of their lives have a 74 percent lower risk of being hospitalized for lower respiratory tract infections. • Giving an infant only breast milk for more than three months of their lives lowers their risk for middle ear…

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Should I Be Worried That I Was Diagnosed with Subchorionic Hemorrhage?

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What is Subchorionic Hemorrhage? This condition is also referred to as subchorionic hematoma. There is excessive bleeding and a collection of blood or hematoma that forms between the chorionic membrane surrounding the embryo, and the wall of the uterus. Subchorionic hemorrhage is caused because the membrane surrounding the embryo separates from the inner lining of the uterus. It is the most common cause of bleeding in the first trimester. How Does a Subchorionic Hemorrhage Affect My Baby? There are a number of factors that determine how this condition affects the baby including how large the hematoma is, the mother’s age and how far along the fetus is in its development. Older pregnant women with large amounts of bleeding have higher rates for miscarriage. Women who experience subchorionic hemorrhage in late first trimester or in second trimester also have an increased chance for miscarriage. Subchorionic hemorrhage also increase the risk for…

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Don’t lose sleep over that.

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“Don’t lose sleep over that”, is common advice for a good reason.  Sleep deprivation has emerged as a significant risk factor for many diseases, from diabetes to high blood pressure and heart attacks.  How about pregnancy?   What are the causes and consequences for mother and baby, and what are the solutions? There are many reasons for lack of sleep during pregnancy. The most common are: Discomfort and pain Snoring, more common in overweight women and over the age of 35 Excessive caffeine consumption in coffee, soda and energy drinks Fluid retention during daily activities causing excessive nighttime urination Restless legs syndrome (RLS) Rhinitis and sinusitis Physicians now realize that sleep loss is a significant risk factor for many diseases like high blood pressure and diabetes.  Poor sleep during pregnancy has been associated with: Pre-eclampsia and high blood pressure Gestational diabetes Excessive weight gain Mood disorders including postpartum depression How to…

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Keeping CRP levels low

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Recently, some well-designed studies have pointed out a link between increased maternal inflammation and a negative impact on infant brain development during pregnancy.  We can track inflammation with a blood test called CRP and in Finland a very large study indicated that high CRP blood levels during pregnancy could impair emotional development later in childhood.  How do mothers keep CRP levels low?  The answer is straight forward: Don’t smoke Keep your teeth in good shape, floss and brush regularly Eat lots of fruits and veggies Exercise 40 minutes 5 days a week Avoid deep fried foods These simple good habits will give your child a “head” start.

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What are Prenatal Hiccups?

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Synopsis: What are prenatal hiccups and should moms be worried? Prenatal hiccups are a very common and normal phenomenon of the developing fetus. The expectant mother generally feels prenatal hiccups in the second trimester, although they may occur earlier and generally taper off early in the third trimester. What’s happening during prenatal hiccups? This spontaneous movement occurs after the central nervous system reaches maturity in utero, when the fetus gains the capability to make “breathing” type movements in and out. The fetus sucks in and expels some of the surrounding amniotic fluid. At this point, the muscle separating the fetal chest and abdominal cavities rapidly contracts, resulting in a hiccup. Hiccups do not appear to cause any discomfort to the fetus and oxygen is still being amply supplied via the unbillical cord. What will I feel when my unborn child hiccups? When a fetus hiccups, the pregnant mother often feels small, repeated…

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How Much Does a Baby Cost?

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How Does the Cost for Hospital Delivery Compare with Delivery at a Birth Center? The US government organization, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Healthcare Utilization Project offers the following hospital cost statistics: Vaginal birth no complications – $9,617 to $10,657 Vaginal birth with complications – $12,532 to $13,749 C-section no complication – $15,799 to $17,859 C-section with complications – $21,495 – $23,923 The American Association of Birth Centers claims that the cost for a vaginal delivery at a birth center is $2,777. How much will it cost to raise my child? The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2012 Expenditures on Children by Families reports that parents with an annual household income between $59,410 and $102,870 can expect to spend $295,560 per child born in 2011 until the age of 17; while parents with an annual household income of less than $59,410 can expect to spend $169,080 per…

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Is it Normal to Have Cramping in the First 3 Weeks of Pregnancy?

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What are implantation cramps? The cramping you experience during the first three weeks of pregnancy is known as implantation cramping. This is an indication that the fertilized egg is attaching itself to the wall of the uterus. These cramps are usually accompanied by light bleeding, which may make a woman mistake them for menstrual cramps and assume she isn’t pregnant. Is implantation cramping common? Approximately twenty to thirty percent of women will experience implantation cramps during early pregnancy. If you notice very light spotting before your menstrual cycle would typically begin, this may be a sign that you are pregnant. Implantation usually happens from six to12 days after ovulation. The majority of women have only a very few drops of bright red or brown spots to indicate that implantation is taking place. How do you describe what implantation cramps feel like? This kind of cramp is described as a dull…

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